At the Devil's Door, 2014 - ★★½

At the Devil's Door, 2014 - ★★½

REVIEWED



"I saw a beast coming out of the sea..."

- Girl (Ava Acres)



An estate agent turns Scooby Doo after she tries to fathom out why creepy shits happening with an house shes selling.


If your willing to put its silly, cliche riddled plot aside, theres a couple of cool scenes and genuine scares to be had from The Pact's director Nicholas McCarthy's swift return to the horror genre Home aka At the Devil’s Door. Far too generic to have ever been a good movie, but still worth a watch when its raining maybe.


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

The creepy Don't Look Now plagiarism.






Originally taken from Letterboxd

Antisocial Behavior, 2014 - ★★

Antisocial Behavior, 2014 - ★★

REVIEWED


"Don't move hes right behind you."

- Young Joe (Brayden Rankin)



Joe's a loner with deep rooted behavioral problems stemming from a tragic event in his youth. When he meets Wendy at a party he tries to turn his life around. Only his hallucinations are getting more vivid and are blurring with his reality.


Mediocre psychological thriller, with a painfully pedestrian pace and boring plot. But it featured a few little touches that held my interest, chiefly its brief stabs at body horror. Plus its editing and most the acting wasn't too bad for such a low budget indie, theres far worse out there.


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

Vomited ball tumors.






Originally taken from Letterboxd

L'arcano incantatore, 1996 - ★★★★

L'arcano incantatore, 1996 - ★★★★

REVIEWED



"His name is Baal and he'll create wounds that won't heal."

- Arcano Incantatore (Carlo Cecchi)



Giacomo Vigetti is accused of sexually harassing a young woman. In order to avoid undue attention he decides to take on a job cataloging rare manuscripts in a remote villa, for a priest who had been excommunicated for allegedly practicing in the occult. Giacomo stumbles onto a destroyed by the church copy of Weyer's Pseudo-Monarchy of Demons, that the priest had been using as a cypher. And eventually uncovers the priests true identity.


The decline of Italian horror (actually Italian cinema in general) during the 90's to present is well documented. Somehow Pupi Avati managed to buck the trend and craft something truly amazing with L'arcano incantatore aka Arcane Sorcerer. Its one of those rare old school horrors that works almost entirely on its sinister atmosphere alone, with minimal special fx. Its lush period production values and two central performances by Stefano Dionisi & Carlo Cecchi helped greatly. HELL I really enjoyed anyway, its sorta reminiscent of a creepy version of Amadeus or even Quills. Dare I call it the last great Italian horror movie?


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

The movie was so interesting it even spurned me to read (which is odd given I've got 'Nicholas Carr's The Shallows' skim reading virus, fuck you g666gle), about the fascinating Johann Weyer and his extraordinary book Pseudomonarchia Daemonum (hell they need to do a Weyer biopic).






Originally taken from Letterboxd

Kalt wie Eis, 1981 - ★★½

Kalt wie Eis, 1981 - ★★½

REVIEWED



"Did you know that these guys keep spiders, snakes and other disgusting animals as pets? Disgusting animal!"

- Hoffmann (Rolf Eden)



Dave fakes a suicide to escape from a youth detention prison. He longs to be with his girl Corinna, and get revenge on the corrupt lawyer Kowalski who framed him. Only Corinna's now mixed up with a wealthy fraudulent insurance boss named Hoffman, so Dave decides its time for him to strike back.


Carl Schenkel's Kalt wie Eis aka Cold Like Ice / Strike Back is a post punk, disenfranchised youth rebellion movie, with a protagonist that loses focus on why he's actually rebelling. Obviously meant as some sort of call to arms statement about not taking it like a bitch. Sadly for all its 2+2=5 styled faux news propaganda, it only really managed to work as a violent crime movie.


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

Hoffman's homosexual razor thugs. Brigitte Wöllner was lovely looking. Fuck you Quadrophenia this is how to end your life on a bike.






Originally taken from Letterboxd

Proxy, 2013 - ★★★½

Proxy, 2013 - ★★★½

REVIEWED



"I just came to do the things you couldn't do.

- Esther (Alexia Rasmussen)



Pregnant loner Esther is violently attacked and loses the child. After her trauma shes understandably feeling dissociated, her only form of solace is a support group for parents who've lost children. Here she connects with a young mother Melanie, who hasn't even lost her child.


I'd previously seen Zack Parker's Scalene and mentioned he likes to riff on Hitchcockian music and camera angles. Proxy continues that during key segments, but thankfully its a much more rewarding and focussed film than I remember Scalene being. At least I knew what I should be feeling with the films atmosphere and story this time around.


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

I'll be your mirror reflect what you are...






Originally taken from Letterboxd

Day of the Wolves, 1971 - ★★★½

Day of the Wolves, 1971 - ★★★½

REVIEWED



"One wolf can maul a full flock of sheep, imagine what seven can do!"

- No.1 (Jan Murray)



Enjoyable heist b-movie about an audacious gang of 7 specialists that attempt to fly into a small town to rob their banks. Within a certain timeframe, before the city authorities are alerted and reach them.


Viewed because I was expecting it to be a revisionist western (especially being included on Mill Creek's Gunslinger Classics 50 Movie Pack), it does give a western vibe but isn't set in frontier era, so I'm not gonna throw it into Sunday machismovision films (*I have got the director Ferde Grofé Jr western The Proud and Damned lined up for next time). If your willing to let Day of the Wolves crude aesthetics and clearly none actor cast slip, its a damned entertaining film that would make a perfect double feature with The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, which came a few years later.


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

The clown wig-out fade to credits. The gang training, naming each other by numbers (No.1 through No.7) and walking down the street in black was most definitely plagiarized by a certain Mr. Taraninto of Knoxville Tennessee.






Originally taken from Letterboxd

The Great Train Robbery, 1903 - ★★★★

The Great Train Robbery, 1903 - ★★★★

REVIEWED


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

A film by Edwin S. Porter

USA 1903

B&W 11 Min.




..:: Machismovision: Wow The West Was Fun - Film #24 ::..

A gang of bandits pull off a daring train robbery and are then hotly pursued by a lawbringing posse.


Well I had to see this silent classic during one of my machismovision Sundays, so it might as well be now. The Great Train Robbery is apparently among the earliest existing films in American cinema archives and essentially the first ever western (though theres apparently earlier examples from Europe, most sadly now lost).


[Personal Reasons For Remembering]

I watched the original then a composite fan made version detailing the vintage effects that are used in the short. It ended with a brief tribute segment featuring movies that had used its iconic closing scene featuring a gunman shooting into the screen (trust me you've seen it even if you've never seen this short), that included Goodfellas & American Gangster.






Originally taken from Letterboxd